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Learning Turkish - 1st Report

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Manage episode 382261036 series 2931064
Innehåll tillhandahållet av Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/NativeEnglishLessons. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/NativeEnglishLessons eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.

Send me a text message. Suggestions? Subjects for future podcasts? Let me know--thanks!

About a week ago I decided I would learn some Turkish. Why Turkish you might ask? And the answer is I don't really have a good reason. I'm 75 years old. I'm not going to travel to Turkey. I have no local friends who speak Turkish. So I have no good reason. I don't need it for work. I don't need it for anything. But as far as that goes I don't really need the foreign languages that I speak. I don't need French. I like it. I like it a lot. I don't need Spanish. I can communicate in Spanish. So no, I don't need Turkish for anything. So why did I choose Turkish? The answer I guess is number 1, I'm curious to see if I can learn some of a new language at my age. Number 2, learning or trying to learn a new language helps me to be a better teacher of English. Why? Because when you're suffering through what your students are suffering through, you are more sympathetic, or you should be, and your understanding of what it's like to learn another language is increased.

It has been a long time since I began to study a language as a new experience. It's been decades. I know how to do it because I've done it about eight times in my life. But I've never studied Turkish before and Turkish is what the linguists call an agglutinative language. Agglutinative means that you have a root word and you add suffixes. And none of the other languages that I've ever studied was agglutinative. So this will be a new experience for me from a grammatical point of view.

There are also sounds in Turkish that do not seem to exist in English as far as I can tell after one week. So it'll be a test for my hearing, a test for my linguistic ear. It'll be a test for my ability to figure out grammar. It'll definitely be a test for my memory. I don't know how fast I would learn new words if I was learning Turkish at age five and living in Turkey with Turkish parents. But it'll certainly be a slower process for me at age 75. I'm going to need a lot of repetition.

One more reason I chose Turkish, although it's a reason that could have applied to other languages, is that I have access to native speakers of Turkish on the Tandem app. And it is possible for me to trade some help with English in return for help with Turkish. And having access to native speakers is very important. In fact, it's an absolute necessity.

Okay, just some brief remarks about my methods, my beginner methods for learning Turkish after all these years of studying languages and not studying languages. The first thing that I have already begun doing is to listen to Turkish. I have several podcasts that I've been listening to. They're 10 to 20 minutes long, a few stories in Turkish. And all I'm doing is listening. I don't understand the words except for one or two here and there. But basically, I'm only listening to the sounds of the Turkish language. I want to get it into my ear. I want to start getting it into my brain. This is what babies do. If you're a baby born in China or you're a baby born in Ecuador or South Africa or Senegal or France, you're born and you start listening to the language of your parents. So right now, I'm a newborn baby somewhere in Turkey. I don't need to understand. Nobody expects me to understand. I'm just listening to the sounds. And if you do this even for a week, for an hour or two every day, it's amazingly helpful, at least I think it is.

[Please see the transcript for the rest of the podcast text--tha

Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com

Support the Show.

You can now support my podcasts and classes:
Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

  continue reading

178 episoder

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iconDela
 
Manage episode 382261036 series 2931064
Innehåll tillhandahållet av Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/NativeEnglishLessons. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/NativeEnglishLessons eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.

Send me a text message. Suggestions? Subjects for future podcasts? Let me know--thanks!

About a week ago I decided I would learn some Turkish. Why Turkish you might ask? And the answer is I don't really have a good reason. I'm 75 years old. I'm not going to travel to Turkey. I have no local friends who speak Turkish. So I have no good reason. I don't need it for work. I don't need it for anything. But as far as that goes I don't really need the foreign languages that I speak. I don't need French. I like it. I like it a lot. I don't need Spanish. I can communicate in Spanish. So no, I don't need Turkish for anything. So why did I choose Turkish? The answer I guess is number 1, I'm curious to see if I can learn some of a new language at my age. Number 2, learning or trying to learn a new language helps me to be a better teacher of English. Why? Because when you're suffering through what your students are suffering through, you are more sympathetic, or you should be, and your understanding of what it's like to learn another language is increased.

It has been a long time since I began to study a language as a new experience. It's been decades. I know how to do it because I've done it about eight times in my life. But I've never studied Turkish before and Turkish is what the linguists call an agglutinative language. Agglutinative means that you have a root word and you add suffixes. And none of the other languages that I've ever studied was agglutinative. So this will be a new experience for me from a grammatical point of view.

There are also sounds in Turkish that do not seem to exist in English as far as I can tell after one week. So it'll be a test for my hearing, a test for my linguistic ear. It'll be a test for my ability to figure out grammar. It'll definitely be a test for my memory. I don't know how fast I would learn new words if I was learning Turkish at age five and living in Turkey with Turkish parents. But it'll certainly be a slower process for me at age 75. I'm going to need a lot of repetition.

One more reason I chose Turkish, although it's a reason that could have applied to other languages, is that I have access to native speakers of Turkish on the Tandem app. And it is possible for me to trade some help with English in return for help with Turkish. And having access to native speakers is very important. In fact, it's an absolute necessity.

Okay, just some brief remarks about my methods, my beginner methods for learning Turkish after all these years of studying languages and not studying languages. The first thing that I have already begun doing is to listen to Turkish. I have several podcasts that I've been listening to. They're 10 to 20 minutes long, a few stories in Turkish. And all I'm doing is listening. I don't understand the words except for one or two here and there. But basically, I'm only listening to the sounds of the Turkish language. I want to get it into my ear. I want to start getting it into my brain. This is what babies do. If you're a baby born in China or you're a baby born in Ecuador or South Africa or Senegal or France, you're born and you start listening to the language of your parents. So right now, I'm a newborn baby somewhere in Turkey. I don't need to understand. Nobody expects me to understand. I'm just listening to the sounds. And if you do this even for a week, for an hour or two every day, it's amazingly helpful, at least I think it is.

[Please see the transcript for the rest of the podcast text--tha

Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com

Support the Show.

You can now support my podcasts and classes:
Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

  continue reading

178 episoder

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