Artwork

Innehåll tillhandahållet av Awaiting Admission: BTK's Unconfessed Crimes | The Dennis Rader Story and True Crime Today. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av Awaiting Admission: BTK's Unconfessed Crimes | The Dennis Rader Story and True Crime Today eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.
Player FM - Podcast-app
Gå offline med appen Player FM !

The Sick 'Bond' That BTK Still Holds with Victims

8:18
 
Dela
 

Manage episode 376673296 series 3505767
Innehåll tillhandahållet av Awaiting Admission: BTK's Unconfessed Crimes | The Dennis Rader Story and True Crime Today. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av Awaiting Admission: BTK's Unconfessed Crimes | The Dennis Rader Story and True Crime Today eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.
In a recent episode of the podcast "Hidden Killers" hosted by Tony Brueski, psychotherapist and author Shavaun Scott discussed the possibility that Dennis Rader, also known as the BTK (Bind, Torture, Kill) killer, may be linked to more unsolved cases than previously thought. Osage County Sheriff Eddie Virden recently initiated an investigation to find possible links between Rader and Cynthia Kinney, a 16-year-old who disappeared in the 1970s. This move was prompted after the discovery of the phrase "Bad laundry day" in Rader's writings, which could possibly be linked to Kinney's disappearance.
During the podcast, Scott highlighted the difficulties in solving these cases, given Rader's penchant for mind games. Rader, who is serving 10 consecutive life terms for 10 murders committed between 1974 and 1991, has always been open about the crimes he committed. However, he has not claimed any responsibility for the Cynthia Kinney case. Scott shared, "You never know when a person like this is telling the truth... So I think it's a horrifying, real possibility that he was involved in this other disappearance."
Rader's mental state and aging process were also discussed, particularly in relation to his willingness to reveal any past crimes. Brueski mentioned the case of the Golden State Killer, who, despite being of advanced age, did not disclose any information. Scott noted that there has not been any research on dementia in serial killers and how it may affect their willingness to disclose past crimes, which presents an intriguing area for study.
Another case discussed in the podcast was that of Shawna Beth Garber, a 22-year-old whose body was discovered in 1990. The autopsy revealed that she had been raped, strangled, and restrained with bindings, which are similar to Rader's modus operandi, except for the rape. Rader admitted to getting sexually aroused by his crimes and pleasuring himself at the crime scenes but denied ever raping anyone. Scott mentioned that it's possible that Rader could be connected to this case, as serial killers' methods can sometimes vary.
The episode also touched on the strange phenomenon of murderers keeping "trophies" from their victims. Recently, objects buried deep underground were found on Rader's former property in Park City. Scott explained that even if the trophies are not used for masturbation, which is common among serial killers, keeping them represents a bond with the victim. "It's almost like here's a tangible object that represents this person to me, and I've got it... there's this whole weird internal dynamic about being bonded together forever into eternity with your victims," Scott elaborated.
Overall, the podcast episode shed light on the ongoing efforts to link Dennis Rader to other unsolved cases and the psychological complexities of serial killers. While Rader's declining health and mind games present challenges for investigators, the discussion highlighted the importance of continued research and investigation to bring closure to the families of the victims.
  continue reading

74 episoder

Artwork
iconDela
 
Manage episode 376673296 series 3505767
Innehåll tillhandahållet av Awaiting Admission: BTK's Unconfessed Crimes | The Dennis Rader Story and True Crime Today. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av Awaiting Admission: BTK's Unconfessed Crimes | The Dennis Rader Story and True Crime Today eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.
In a recent episode of the podcast "Hidden Killers" hosted by Tony Brueski, psychotherapist and author Shavaun Scott discussed the possibility that Dennis Rader, also known as the BTK (Bind, Torture, Kill) killer, may be linked to more unsolved cases than previously thought. Osage County Sheriff Eddie Virden recently initiated an investigation to find possible links between Rader and Cynthia Kinney, a 16-year-old who disappeared in the 1970s. This move was prompted after the discovery of the phrase "Bad laundry day" in Rader's writings, which could possibly be linked to Kinney's disappearance.
During the podcast, Scott highlighted the difficulties in solving these cases, given Rader's penchant for mind games. Rader, who is serving 10 consecutive life terms for 10 murders committed between 1974 and 1991, has always been open about the crimes he committed. However, he has not claimed any responsibility for the Cynthia Kinney case. Scott shared, "You never know when a person like this is telling the truth... So I think it's a horrifying, real possibility that he was involved in this other disappearance."
Rader's mental state and aging process were also discussed, particularly in relation to his willingness to reveal any past crimes. Brueski mentioned the case of the Golden State Killer, who, despite being of advanced age, did not disclose any information. Scott noted that there has not been any research on dementia in serial killers and how it may affect their willingness to disclose past crimes, which presents an intriguing area for study.
Another case discussed in the podcast was that of Shawna Beth Garber, a 22-year-old whose body was discovered in 1990. The autopsy revealed that she had been raped, strangled, and restrained with bindings, which are similar to Rader's modus operandi, except for the rape. Rader admitted to getting sexually aroused by his crimes and pleasuring himself at the crime scenes but denied ever raping anyone. Scott mentioned that it's possible that Rader could be connected to this case, as serial killers' methods can sometimes vary.
The episode also touched on the strange phenomenon of murderers keeping "trophies" from their victims. Recently, objects buried deep underground were found on Rader's former property in Park City. Scott explained that even if the trophies are not used for masturbation, which is common among serial killers, keeping them represents a bond with the victim. "It's almost like here's a tangible object that represents this person to me, and I've got it... there's this whole weird internal dynamic about being bonded together forever into eternity with your victims," Scott elaborated.
Overall, the podcast episode shed light on the ongoing efforts to link Dennis Rader to other unsolved cases and the psychological complexities of serial killers. While Rader's declining health and mind games present challenges for investigators, the discussion highlighted the importance of continued research and investigation to bring closure to the families of the victims.
  continue reading

74 episoder

Alla avsnitt

×
 
Loading …

Välkommen till Player FM

Player FM scannar webben för högkvalitativa podcasts för dig att njuta av nu direkt. Den är den bästa podcast-appen och den fungerar med Android, Iphone och webben. Bli medlem för att synka prenumerationer mellan enheter.

 

Snabbguide