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Hot Yoga and Sodium-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

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Manage episode 373923199 series 3479554
Innehåll tillhandahållet av American Physiological Society. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av American Physiological Society eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.

Come for the yoga metaphors, stay for the science. In this episode, Associate Editor Dr. Keith Brunt (Dalhousie University) interviews author Dr. Stacy Hunter (Texas State University) and expert Dr. Annet Kirabo (Vanderbilt University) about the new study by Hunter et al., which examined the impact of hot yoga on sodium-induced pressor responses and endothelial function of Black women. In a randomized control trial that combined the thermal stress of hot yoga and a salt challenge, the authors investigated human homeostatic regulation in terms of whole-body physiology, cardiorenal responses, physical activity, and the exercise environment. In their study, Hunter and collaborators controlled for sodium intake by separating participants into high and low sodium groups, with pre and post analyses of body mass, ambulatory blood pressure, urinalysis, and flow mediated dilation. The authors found that participants who actively engaged in hot yoga showed increased flow mediated dilation but not increased blood pressure. Why did the authors use a 3-day, not 5-day, hot yoga exercise protocol? What insights can be gained about salt-sensitivity in Black women from this study, which incorporated a form of exercise that activated both thermoregulation and the parasympathetic nervous system? Listen to find out.

Stacy D. Hunter, Stavros A. Kavouras, and Mitra Rahimi Exploring heated exercise as a means of preventing the deleterious effects of high-sodium intake in Black women Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published May 4, 2023. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00699.2022

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20 episoder

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iconDela
 
Manage episode 373923199 series 3479554
Innehåll tillhandahållet av American Physiological Society. Allt poddinnehåll inklusive avsnitt, grafik och podcastbeskrivningar laddas upp och tillhandahålls direkt av American Physiological Society eller deras podcastplattformspartner. Om du tror att någon använder ditt upphovsrättsskyddade verk utan din tillåtelse kan du följa processen som beskrivs här https://sv.player.fm/legal.

Come for the yoga metaphors, stay for the science. In this episode, Associate Editor Dr. Keith Brunt (Dalhousie University) interviews author Dr. Stacy Hunter (Texas State University) and expert Dr. Annet Kirabo (Vanderbilt University) about the new study by Hunter et al., which examined the impact of hot yoga on sodium-induced pressor responses and endothelial function of Black women. In a randomized control trial that combined the thermal stress of hot yoga and a salt challenge, the authors investigated human homeostatic regulation in terms of whole-body physiology, cardiorenal responses, physical activity, and the exercise environment. In their study, Hunter and collaborators controlled for sodium intake by separating participants into high and low sodium groups, with pre and post analyses of body mass, ambulatory blood pressure, urinalysis, and flow mediated dilation. The authors found that participants who actively engaged in hot yoga showed increased flow mediated dilation but not increased blood pressure. Why did the authors use a 3-day, not 5-day, hot yoga exercise protocol? What insights can be gained about salt-sensitivity in Black women from this study, which incorporated a form of exercise that activated both thermoregulation and the parasympathetic nervous system? Listen to find out.

Stacy D. Hunter, Stavros A. Kavouras, and Mitra Rahimi Exploring heated exercise as a means of preventing the deleterious effects of high-sodium intake in Black women Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published May 4, 2023. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00699.2022

  continue reading

20 episoder

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