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An audio feed of Capitol Hill presentations by experts in the field of climate change, hosted by the American Meteorological Society's Environmental Policy Program.This podcast should be updated within 24 hours of the live presentations.Producer: Larry Gillick, Assistant Professor, Digital and Broadcast Media, Shenandoah University
 
From Earthwatch, the environmental nonprofit connecting citizens with scientists, comes the Earthwatch Podcast. This season, we profile the status of endangered species and ecosystems, and the efforts underway to save them. From the coastal marshes of Texas to the seagrass meadows of Southeast Alaska and beyond, join us as we explore the complex web of science, politics, and human interference.
 
Artist Von Wong searches far and wide to bring to you stories of Social Impact from all over the world. Featured guests include Oscar-winning Filmmakers, Nasa Scientists, Youth Activists, Social Entrepreneurs, Artists, Entrepreneurs, and Futurists. This podcast is here to show you that regardless of your interests, background, or skillset - you too can make a difference.
 
Planet Pod - From politicians to protesters, scientists to entrepreneurs, we talk to the peoplebehind the headlines.We are in a climate emergency. What can we do to protect our planet? At Planet Pod we believe that the first step is to take action, every small step adds up to change. We aim to share ideas and knowledge to help us all live more sustainable lives. Together we can make great strides towards halting climate change and making a difference, but the time to act is now.Planet Pod is ...
 
Podcast: Star Seed Radio Hosted by: Jonah Bolt Show Description:Starseed Radio is hosted by Jonah Bolt, a modern day renaissance man. Jonah has traveled to over 40 countries world-wide, Has toured the US for motivational speaking, done numerous TV & Radio Interviews globally and has been published over a dozen times for his poetry and other writings. Given his grace and energy toward people awakening to what is happening in this world, Jonah is inspired to help empower people through sustain ...
 
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From coal mining in Colombia to the Ecuadorian cloud forest - one woman's fight for climate justice. Monica Feria-Tinta, a UK based barrister, uses the principles of Human Rights law and Earth's Jurisprudence (the rights of mother earth) to halt the tide on pollution and protect the rights of indigenous peoples in Colombia, Mexico and the Torres St…
 
What if outer space is not outside the human environment but, rather, defines it? This is the unusual starting point of Valerie Olson’s Into the Extreme: U.S. Environmental Systems and Politics Beyond Earth (U Minnesota Press, 2018), revealing how outer space contributes to making what counts as the scope and scale of today’s natural and social env…
 
Merav Ben-David is a wildlife ecologist at the University of Wyoming. Her specialty? The effects of global environmental change on animals and their ecosystems. Her next move? A run for the U.S. Senate. In this episode, host Janet McCabe talks with Dr. Ben-David about what it means for a climate scientist to run for office in a state whose economy …
 
In Colombia, decades of social and armed conflict and the US-led war on drugs have created a seemingly untenable situation for scientists and rural communities as they attempt to care for forests and grow non-illicit crops. In her new book Vital Decomposition: Soil Practitioners and Life Politics (Duke University Press, 2020), Kristina M. Lyons pre…
 
As You Sow is a non-profit foundation that utilizes shareholder advocacy to force corporations to be more responsible in their business. They have had remarkable successes with big corporations and the type of change they have been involved in can have huge rippling effects through sectors and society. Joining us on the show is Sarah Milne, Vice Pr…
 
Does this U.S. election season have your head spinning? In this episode, Grist reporter Zoya Teirstein and LA Times reporter Sammy Roth take us from the national to the local on what's important in terms of the environment. If you have any thoughts or questions about the show, you can tweet at us or send an email to itcpod@iu.edu.…
 
Can social media change the world? Today’s guest, Alison Teal, hopes to have a positive impact and enact environmental and social change through her digital platforms. Also known as the “Female Indiana Jones,” Alison lives and works at the intersection of education and entertainment, an influencer and adventurer. Alison travels the world with her c…
 
In this bonus episode, we talk with organizers and participants from the award-winning Educating for Environmental Change program. Kirstin Milks, Adam Scribner, Michael Hamburger, LaStelshia Speaks, and Catherine Boileau explain how they've adapted their practices for the challenges we face today. If you have any thoughts or questions about the sho…
 
Water and diplomatic historian Dan MacFarlane has written a fascinating book on a fundamental debate in environmental history: What is a natural landscape? Fixing Niagara Falls: Environment, Energy, and Engineers at the World’s Most Famous Waterfall (UBC Press, 2020) argues that one of the world's most famous natural attractions is not wholly natur…
 
With early voting opening around the U.S. and Election Day just about a month away, we want to dive into the races and issues to watch this season. In the first episode of our pre-election series, we go live with policy expert Julian Brave NoiseCat and energy/politics reporter Ben Geman to discuss what this year's elections could mean for climate, …
 
Philanthropic investment funds are far less helpful than they would lead us to believe. This means that investing for the good of humanity needs to follow a different model. Today, we explore a concept called impact investing with Dr. Charly Kleissner, a novel approach he has been developing over the last 20 years that prioritizes impact over retur…
 
In 1800, tens of millions of bison roamed the North American Great Plains. By 1900, fewer than 1,000 remained. In The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750-1920 (Cambridge UP, 2000), the University of Kansas Hall Distinguished Professor of History Andrew C. Isenberg explains how this ecological calamity came to pass. Bison popula…
 
La Batea is an unconventional book. A collaboration between anthropologist Elizabeth Ferry and her photographer brother Stephen, it combines text and images to paint a picture of the lives of small-scale miners in Colombia in a unique and powerful way. Moreover, the book is physically designed to pull the reader into the topic. Cardboard covers, a …
 
Crows can be found almost everywhere that people are, from tropical islands to deserts and arctic forests, from densely populated cities to suburbs and farms. Across these diverse landscapes, many species of crow are doing well: their intelligent and adaptive ways of life have allowed them to thrive amid human-driven transformations. Indeed, crows …
 
In this week's Air Check, we talk about the (former) acting director of the Bureau of Land Management who served unlawfully for 424 days, the scientist running for Senate in Wyoming, and International Coffee Day. Resources: Judge removes Trump’s public lands boss, William Perry Pendley, after governor sued Meet the climate expert running to be the …
 
As the movement against animal cruelty and the suffering caused by the meat and dairy industries continues to gain momentum, there are important and world-shifting developments happening across many different sectors of industry and science. Joining us to talk about his work to reduce animal cruelty in the food sector is Josh Balk, Vice President o…
 
In Climate Crisis and the Global Green New Deal: The Political Economy of Saving the Planet (Verso Books, 2020), Noam Chomsky, the world’s leading public intellectual, and Robert Pollin, the renowned progressive economist, map out the catastrophic consequences of unchecked climate change—and present a realistic blueprint for change: the Green New D…
 
Debjani Bhattacharyya’s Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta: The Making of Calcutta (Cambridge University Press) asks: What happens when a distant colonial power tries to tame an unfamiliar terrain in the world's largest tidal delta? This history of dramatic ecological changes in the Bengal Delta from 1760 to 1920 involves land, water and humans…
 
The Mekong River is one of the world’s great rivers. From its source in the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau it snakes down through southern China and then borders or runs through all the countries of mainland Southeast Asia: Myanmar, Thailand, Lao, Cambodia and Vietnam. Almost 70 million people depend either directly or indirectly on the Mekong for their l…
 
Resource scarcity, pollution, overpopulation — we are at a point in the trajectory of civilization where we must either remain complacent and stick to our linear economic model, or we take action to enact change. But, as consumers, how do we know what information to trust and what to do with it? On the other side of the coin, how do researchers and…
 
Sue Stuart-Smith, who is a distinguished psychiatrist and avid gardener, offers an inspiring and consoling work about the healing effects of gardening and its ability to decrease stress and foster mental well-being in our everyday lives. The garden is often seen as a refuge, a place to forget worldly cares, removed from the “real” life that lies ou…
 
Some people insist that culture is strictly a human accomplishment. What are those people afraid of? Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace (Henry Holt and Co.) looks into three cultures of other-than-human beings in some of Earth’s remaining wild places. It shows how if you’re a sperm whale, a scarlet m…
 
Meet Ivan Cash: Human Connection Specialist, Artist, Filmmaker, and Speaker. His focus is building human connection and reducing the overload of technology in the modern world. Ivan has a special gift for finding the extraordinary in the ordinary, and his eye for a great idea is second to none. After all, his projects are designed to go viral and h…
 
The pace, intensity, and scale at which humans have altered our planet in recent decades is unprecedented. We have dramatically transformed landscapes and waterways through agriculture, logging, mining, and fire suppression, with drastic impacts on public health and human well-being. What can we do to counteract and even reverse the worst of these …
 
What would actually make America great? More people. If the most challenging crisis in living memory has shown us anything, it’s that America has lost the will and the means to lead. From one of our foremost policy writers, One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger (Portfolio) is the provocative yet logical argument that if we aren’t movi…
 
Despite their protected status, one-third of the world’s nature reserves are under threat from human activity. Enter Code of Conscience: an elegant software solution that aims to stop the big machines that are used to destroy the planet. Today’s guests are its creators, Hugo Veiga and Diego Machado, who share their story and the challenges that the…
 
This summer, people in United States and beyond took to the streets to demand racial justice. One of the loudest calls was to defund and abolish the police, but not just the police. Abolitionists have long worked to dismantle the broader U.S. carceral state, which imprisons more people than any other nation. "Abolition has to be 'green.'" Ruth Wils…
 
Over the past ten years, Chantal Bilodeau has made a name for herself a playwright singularly dedicated to writing plays about the issue of climate change. These are not dry docu-dramas, but deeply human depictions of life in the far north, where climate change is a daily reality. Forward (Tanlonbooks 2018) is the latest work in her Artic Cycle, an…
 
Saint Lucia’s rural landscape is more forested today than at any time in at least seventy-five years (probably much longer). This change is profoundly significant given widespread efforts to achieve sustainable development on small-island states like Saint Lucia. Yet, this seemingly good-news story runs contrary to most conventional narratives abou…
 
The protection of African wildlife enjoys the support of large numbers of individuals and institutions throughout the world. In Wildlife between Empire and Nation in Twentieth Century Africa (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), Jeff Schauer explains how this global attention to African wildlife evolved from late nineteenth century to the present. By tracing…
 
Soqotra, the largest island of Yemen's Soqotra Archipelago, is one of the most uniquely diverse places in the world. A UNESCO natural World Heritage Site, the island is home not only to birds, reptiles, and plants found nowhere else on earth, but also to a rich cultural history and the endangered Soqotri language. Within the span of a decade, this …
 
In the third and final episode of our land defender series, we talk with Eduardo Brondizio, David Rodríguez Goyes, and Stella Emery Santana about the international systems that have long exploited indigenous land and resources, as well as indigenous and peasant resistance efforts and opportunities to support land defenders. If you have any thoughts…
 
An estimated 92 million tons of textiles go to landfills across the globe each year. Today’s guest is Graham Ross, a serial entrepreneur looking to change this. During a mid-life crisis, Graham switched careers into the fashion industry, without having any experience. This isn’t a story about how Graham started a fashion line just to look more fash…
 
Should climate change policy be subject to a cost-benefit analysis leading to a variety of policy choices? Or is it so critical that the only "proper" path is immediate and extreme carbon reduction, regardless of the costs and the impact of those measures on the welfare of the population? Bjorn Lomborg's new and controversial work, False Alarm: How…
 
Over 2 Billion people in the world live without access to toilets and clean sanitation. Serial entrepreneur Jack Sim has made it his life’s work to address this problem, starting the World Toilet Organization and helping instate World Toilet Day, raising awareness, and making change happen. Today, we hear from Jack about how he began this conversat…
 
In the second episode of our land defender series, we talk with land defender Marvin Wilcox and Front Line Defenders representative Adam Shapiro. They walk us through Marvin's story, in which agricultural producers in Panama take on the state and a transnational fruit company to protect their land and health, as well as the patterns commonly encoun…
 
Beginning in the 1870s, migrant groups from Russia's steppes settled in the similar environment of the Great Plains. Many were Mennonites. They brought plants, in particular grain and fodder crops, trees and shrubs, as well as weeds. Following their example, and drawing on the expertise of émigré Russian-Jewish scientists, the US Department of Agri…
 
Despite being a minor contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, like many other small island nations, The Bahamas’s ecology and society are especially vulnerable to current and expected changes to the oceans and the climate. Spectacular coral reefs, low-lying islands, and a social life oriented towards the sea makes The Bahamas a posterchild …
 
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