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An audio feed of Capitol Hill presentations by experts in the field of climate change, hosted by the American Meteorological Society's Environmental Policy Program.This podcast should be updated within 24 hours of the live presentations.Producer: Larry Gillick, Assistant Professor, Digital and Broadcast Media, Shenandoah University
 
Kläderna, maten, kroppen, sinnet, produkterna vi köper, valen vi gör. Det här är en podcast som utforskar hållbarhet i alla aspekter av livet. Kan vi leva ett rikt liv utan att ta mer än vi behöver? Vi som pratar heter Milla & Jonna och kallar oss cyniska miljövetare. Presenteras i samarbete med Medveten Konsumtion. Följ oss: "Du, Jag och Jorden" på Instagram, Facebook & Twitter Email: dujagochjorden@gmail.com
 
From Earthwatch, the environmental nonprofit connecting citizens with scientists, comes the Earthwatch Podcast. This season, we profile the status of endangered species and ecosystems, and the efforts underway to save them. From the coastal marshes of Texas to the seagrass meadows of Southeast Alaska and beyond, join us as we explore the complex web of science, politics, and human interference.
 
The eco-conscious lifestyle podcast. Each week, Laura Diez is diving into sustainability and practical climate science. This podcast explores fashion, environmental justice, food, conscious consumerism… just about everything in our lives is tied to the environment. Guests include female founders, clean beauty experts, climate scientists, political experts, and many more. Laura is a sustainability professional with her M.S. in Climate Science and Solutions, who happens to also love speaking t ...
 
Planet Innovation is a podcast discussing business solutions to environmental problems. We bring inspiring conversations with scientists and entrepreneurs who are on a mission to protect our planet. This is not another doom-and-gloom sustainability podcast. Instead, we are choosing to focus on innovative solutions, from solar clothing to lab meat or wooden skyscrapers to electric scooters, to examine how science and entrepreneurship can save the earth.
 
Climate change is confusing. This MIT podcast breaks down the science, technologies, and policies behind climate change, how it’s impacting us, and what our society can do about it. Each quick episode gives you the what, why, and how on climate change — from real scientists — to help us all make informed decisions for our future.
 
Simplify the complexities of life through a stimulating, provocative, and fun narrative journey with the world’s most supremely intriguing, refreshingly forthright artists, scholars, scientists, entrepreneurs, experts, and humans. Hear insights, advice and winning paradigms that guide you toward your best self and a brighter future, all while expanding your knowledge of the amazing happenings on our planet. Link to survey: https://bit.ly/2EcYbu4
 
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What does a fossil fuel boom town feel like for those living in it? And what's possible once the coal's burned and the wells are dry? In this episode, Rock Springs-raised J.J. Anselmi shares what he's seen and heard in collecting oral histories of the Wyoming boom town. J.J.'s piece in The New Republic: https://newrepublic.com/article/160689/rise-f…
 
In Scorched Earth: Environmental Warfare as a Crime Against Humanity and Nature (Princeton UP, 2021), Emmanuel Kreike offers a global history of environmental warfare and makes the case for why it should be a crime. The environmental infrastructure that sustains human societies has been a target and instrument of war for centuries, resulting in fam…
 
We live in an age in which we are repeatedly reminded—by scientists, by the media, by popular culture—of the looming threat of mass extinction. We’re told that human activity is currently producing a sixth mass extinction, perhaps of even greater magnitude than the five previous geological catastrophes that drastically altered life on Earth. Indeed…
 
Ian M. Miller’s book Fir and Empire: The Transformation of Forests in Early Modern China (University of Washington Press, 2020) offers a transformation of our understanding of China’s early modern environmental history. Using a wide range of archival materials, including tax, deed, and timber market records, Miller presents a picture of China’s for…
 
We are celebrating Inauguration Day 2021 with Dr. Gretchen Goldman! Today, Gretchen and I speak about what happened to environmental protection during the Trump Administration, and then start to set the scene for what we can expect from the incoming Biden Administation. We discuss Cabinet appointments and the specific qualifications of a few notabl…
 
Our big question for the series is, why do we extract and burn natural gas? To answer this question, we’re addressing smaller questions around the physical science of hydraulic fracturing/emissions/health effects, ownership of and responsibility for assets, and conflicts (hyperlocal and international) around natural gas. In this live episode: Keith…
 
Today I talked to Chris Hamby about his book Soul Full of Coal Dust: The True Story of an Epic Battle for Justice (Little Brown, 2020). Hamby looks into why there has been a surge in black-lung disease in West Virginia and elsewhere in recent years. Poor self-policing and rapacious business practices go a long way in explaining the upsurge. Add in …
 
In The Last Turtlemen of the Caribbean: Waterscapes of Labor, Conservation, and Boundary Makin (University of North Carolina Press 2020), Dr. Sharika Crawford tells the story of Caymanian turtle hunters, men that plied the sea in search of the green and the hawksbill turtles. Using the personal stories of turtlemen collected by the Oral History Pro…
 
Kristina Marusic, who covers environmental health and justice issues in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania for Environmental Health News, helps us understand how fracking and natural gas affect community health and how one community has responded. Find Kristina's work here: https://www.ehn.org/u/kristinamarusic1…
 
Jemma Deer’s Radical Animism: Reading for the End of the World (Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2020) invites the reader to take a moment and to ponder on the way of reading. In her book, the author challenges the narcissistic position of the human being: a status that has been established for some time and which has already been challenged before but d…
 
Modern Architecture and Climate explores how leading architects of the twentieth century incorporated climate-mediating strategies into their designs, and shows how regional approaches to climate adaptability were essential to the development of modern architecture. Focusing on the period surrounding World War II—before fossil-fuel powered air-cond…
 
We are opening up our year by acknowledging what must come before we can reasonably expect people to care about the environment: social sustainability. At its core, social sustainability looks at the societal structures in place that allow people to live healthy, happy lives: equity, culture, job opportunities, safety, wages, and all the other thin…
 
Vilka miljöproblem är vi mest oroade över just nu? Detta är del 1 - Millas största oro. Jorderosion och markförstöring pratas det sällan om i hållbarhetsdebatten. Men det är något som vi borde ägna mer uppmärksamhet åt. 95 % av allt vi äter har sitt ursprung i matjorden. Vad har välmående jordar med klimatförändringen och den globala uppvärmningen …
 
Aja Barber is a celebrated writer and stylist focused on the intersection of fashion and equity issues. We touch on two of her recent conversations: #IQuitFastFashionBecause, and the myth of fast fashion existing “for poor people,” when it is actually fueled by the middle class. We also touch on consumerism during the pandemic, marketing tactics, a…
 
Meteorites, mega-volcanoes, and plate tectonics--the old forces of nature--have transformed Earth for millions of years. They are now joined by a new geological force--humans. Our actions have driven Earth into a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. For the first time in our home planet's 4.5-billion-year history a single species is increasingly…
 
In this Air Check, Senator-Elect DeAndrea Newman Salvador joins us to talk about North Carolina's 39th District, which she flipped in the most recent election. As the founder of Renewable Energy Transition Initiative (RETI), she also helps us understand high energy burdens and offers insight into lowering them. Resources: https://salvadorfornc.com/…
 
A Living Past: Environmental Histories of Modern Latin America (Berghahn Books 2018) is a wonderful collection that seeks to provide a general overview of environmental history within Latin American history. Edited by John Soluri, Claudia Leal, and José Augusto Pádua, this fantastic book is meant for specialists and non-specialists alike. In the bo…
 
Butterflies have long captivated the imagination of humans, from naturalists to children to poets. Indeed it would be hard to imagine a world without butterflies. And yet their populations are declining at an alarming rate, to the extent that even the seemingly ubiquitous Monarch could conceivably go the way of the Passenger Pigeon. Many other, mor…
 
“To be a participant in a complex system is to desire to be both lost and found in the interrelationships between people, nature and ideas.” Nora Bateson writes these words in the first chapter of her 2016 book Small Arcs of Larger Circles: Framing Through Other Patterns (Triarchy Press, 2016). It is hard to put this thoughtful anthology into a sin…
 
As ancient creatures that once shared the Earth with dinosaurs, turtles have played a crucial role in maintaining healthy terrestrial and marine ecosystems for more than one hundred million years. While it may not set records for speed on land, the turtle is exceptional at distance swimming and deep diving, and some are gifted with astounding longe…
 
Unstable Ground: Climate Change, Conflict, and Genocide (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017) looks at the human impact of climate change and its potential to provoke some of the most troubling crimes against humanity—ethnic conflict, war, and genocide. Alex Alvarez provides an essential overview of what science has shown to be true about climate change a…
 
In this episode we speak to Anne Lawrence-Mathers, Professor of History at the University of Reading about her new book Medieval Meteorology: Forecasting the Weather from Aristotle to the Almanac, out this year, 2020, with Cambridge University Press. The practice of weather forecasting underwent a crucial transformation in the Middle Ages. Explorin…
 
In this series, we ask, how can spiritual connection with our environment help us enter into right and restorative relationship with the earth, including human and nonhuman inhabitants? Deborah McGregor, who is Anishinaabe from Whitefish River First Nation and a scholar of law and the environment at York University, helps us understand how spiritua…
 
We are joined by Dr. Andrea Ballestero, associate Professor of Anthropology and Director Ethnography Studio, at Rice University. We will be talking about her book A Future History of Water, published by Duke University Press in 2019. Thanks to the Fondren Library's support, an Open Access pdf copy of the book can also be downloaded from the author'…
 
We are joined by superstar science communicator Danni Washington! Danni Washington is a TV host and Science Communicator who is also the first African-American woman to host her own science television series. She is sharing her tips on how to be an effective science communicator, how to maintain the momentum of the climate movement in politics, and…
 
As environmental emergencies go, the explosion of plastic waste is right up there. With global plastic production exceeding 300 million tonnes each year, the world has generally looked at it as an unsightly menace to be removed, but Professor Thomas Maschmeyer has gone beyond that idea. His work challenges our perceptions of waste, by turning plast…
 
Pauulu’s Diaspora: Black Internationalism and Environmental Justice (University Press of Florida, 2020) by Quito Swan is an enchanting, magisterial, broadly researched monograph that illuminates the social life of Black Power politics across the African diaspora from the 1950s through the 1980s. Told through Bermudian activist and engineer Pauulu K…
 
In this series, we ask, how can spiritual connection with our environment help us enter into right and restorative relationship with the earth, including human and nonhuman inhabitants? By talking with folks from different faith traditions, we investigate what spiritual connection is and how it happens, the composition of the environment, and the p…
 
Now deep in the holiday season, even in 2020, we have much to celebrate. But, in the U.S. especially, celebration can lead to a spike in emissions and waste from travel (despite CDC recommendations), obligatory gift-giving, temporary decorations, and feasts. In this episode, we don't tell you to sit alone in a dark room and gnaw on the stems from y…
 
Even before the publication of his seminal Animal Liberation in 1975, Peter Singer, one of the greatest moral philosophers of our time, unflinchingly challenged the ethics of eating animals. Now, in Why Vegan?: Eating Ethically (Liveright, 2020), Singer brings together the most consequential essays of his career to make this devastating case agains…
 
Jessica DeFino is a beauty reporter covering supportive, sustainable skincare based in science and spirituality. She has made a serious name for herself as a beauty reporter firstly specializing in clean beauty, which is a niche, and furthermore as a beauty reporter than does not actively participate in beauty routines and products. Her work aims t…
 
2020 ser ut att bli ett rekordår för mord på miljöaktivister. Det mördas tre gånger så många miljöaktivister som journalister. Vi tar upp två aktuella fall, Jorge Enrique Oramas från Colombia och Fikile Ntshangase från Sydafrika. Samt en uppdatering om fallet Berta Cáceres som vi tog upp i början av 2019 (avsnitt 33). Vi måste som miljöengagerade v…
 
The annual Black Friday episode! Holiday sales are here, our inboxes are flooded, and we are all wondering: how much is *too* much to spend this year? In this episode we are reflecting on what we’ve learned this year: mindful spending means reassessing why you’re feeling pressured to buy, where you want your money to circulate, and maybe even reass…
 
Parrots and snakes, wild cats and monkeys---exotic pets can now be found everywhere from skyscraper apartments and fenced suburban backyards to roadside petting zoos. In Animal Traffic: Lively Capital in the Global Exotic Pet Trade (Duke UP, 2020) Rosemary-Claire Collard investigates the multibillion-dollar global exotic pet trade and the largely h…
 
In this extended Air Check, political scientist Thea Riofrancos joins us to discuss the historical context of Chilean lithium mining and how it relates to the global movement for a renewable energy future. We touch on the Latin American pink tide, the rise of Indigenous environmental movements, and how supporters of a Green New Deal could effective…
 
In this bonus episode, we share just a little bit of The EPA at 50, an online event sponsored by the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Integrated Program in the Environment here at IU. It featured host Janet McCabe, Gina McCarthy, Jim Barnes, and Jody Freeman. The program is edited for time, but you can find the full record…
 
While various systems theories have received rigorous treatments across the literature of the field, reliable and robust advice for systems practice can be somewhat harder to come by. Ray Ison has done much to remedy this state of affairs through his deeply theoretically grounded yet eminently practical book: Systems Practice: How to Act In Situati…
 
First published by Simon & Schuster in 1993 and then by Continuum in 1998, Jim Mason’s An Unnatural Order: The Roots of Our Destruction of Nature has become a classic. With a new Lantern edition expected in early 2021, the book explores, from an anthropological, sociocultural, and holistic perspective, how and why we have cut ourselves off from oth…
 
In 1996 Argentina adopted genetically modified (GM) soybeans as a central part of its national development strategy. Today, Argentina is the third largest global grower and exporter of GM crops. Its soybeans—which have been modified to tolerate being sprayed with herbicides—now cover half of the country's arable land and represent a third of its to…
 
Michael Mascarenhas's book Lessons in Environmental Justice: From Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter and Idle No More (Sage, 2020) provides an entry point to the field by bringing together the works of individuals who are creating a new and vibrant wave of environmental justice scholarship. methodology, and activism. The 18 essays in this collectio…
 
Jacob and Emily talk through the record-breaking catastrophic hurricanes Eta and Iota, which hit Central America only two weeks apart. We zero in on the why and the what now that could lead to a more resilient future. Resources: ‘The Ixil helping the Ixil’: Indigenous people in Guatemala lead their own Hurricane Eta response Storm Eta damage pushes…
 
Kendra Kolb Butler, founder of Alpyn Beauty, traded NYC for Jackson Hole five years ago and never looked back. Today, she’s sharing what she’s learned about skincare, the potency of plants, starting a beauty brand in Wyoming, and making your dreams a reality. A former Manhattanite and 20-year beauty industry veteran, Kendra first created Alpyn Beau…
 
Dr. Graciela Chichilnisky’s new book Reversing Climate Change: How Carbon Removals Can Resolve Climate Change and Fix the Economy is perhaps the single best thing I have read about climate in recent years. Published by World Scientific Press, the book lays out the history of how we came to be in the emergency we are in now, what we have tried befor…
 
Cities are one of the most significant contributors to global climate change. The rapid speed at which urban centers use large amounts of resources adds to the global crisis and can lead to extreme local heat. The Urban Fix: Resilient Cities in the War Against Climate Change, Heat Islands and Overpopulation (Routledge, 2019) addresses how urban des…
 
We are joined by secondhand expert Emily Stochl of Pre-Loved Podcast! We are discussing the global and domestic secondhand economy; supporting garment workers and the Garment Workers’ Protection Act; scratching the surface of the gentrification of thrift; and tips on shopping for vintage or pre-loved items. I am on Pre-Loved Podcast this week! Also…
 
Bovine politics exposes fault lines within contemporary Indian society, where eating beef is simultaneously a violation of sacred taboos, an expression of marginalized identities, and a route to cosmopolitan sophistication. The recent rise of Hindu nationalism has further polarized traditional views: Dalits, Muslims, and Christians protest threats …
 
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