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Along with the primary race for mayor, there was also the consequential race for seats in the New York City Council. 47 out of the total 51 seats were up for grabs and hundreds of candidates were vying for a spot. While it’s still too early to determine all the winners, there were some things we know - and some trends emerging. WNYC's David Cruz jo…
 
New Jersey lawmakers pushed forward a bill that would end the state's eviction moratorium earlier than expected but keep in place protections for renters who can show they've been financially harmed by the pandemic. The measure comes after months of negotiations, bill mergers and last-minute amendments and was praised by both landlord and tenant ad…
 
Bringing riders back to the subway system will be among the highest priorities, and most difficult challenges, on New York City's road to recovery. We spoke to riders about what they missed — or didn't miss — about the subway during the pandemic, how it's changed since last year, and why they still ride. For more, go to Gothamist.com.…
 
New Jersey's highest court has upheld the expansion of seven Newark charter schools greenlit by the state's Education Commissioner more than four years ago. The ruling comes after the Education Law Center, a Newark-based nonprofit, contested the decisions arguing they would saddle traditional public schools with the neediest students and drain the …
 
The district attorney, Melinda Katz appeared in Queens Criminal court today to ask that over three thousand low-level marijuana-related offenses be Katz, who ran on a reform agenda, said she is against prosecuting these cases as they have a disproportionate impact on communities of color. Read the story at Gothamist.com…
 
Protestors jumped on a bus from Newark to Trenton on Monday to demand lawmakers grant civilian complaint review boards in the state powers to oversee alleged police misconduct. "If the police review board don't have subpoena power, we don't want it," said Larry Hamm, chair of the People's Organization for Progress, a longtime civil rights group who…
 
New York City has finally gotten approval to relocate a controversial statue of Theodore Roosevelt from the steps of the American Museum of Natural History. The city's Public Design Commission unanimously approved a plan to relocate the bronze statue, which depicts Roosevelt atop a horse, and flanked by figures of a Native American and a Black man …
 
An Asian NYPD detective, Vincent Cheung, is suing a man who was captured on camera spewing a racist tirade at the 16-year veteran.The lawsuit, filed in Manhattan Supreme Court last month, says Terrell Harper harassed Cheung repeatedly during a demonstration in Greenwich Village, on March 11, 2021, calling the cop a “goddamn cat eater” and asking if…
 
"A Thousand Ways" at the Public Theater asks us to reveal ourselves to a stranger - another (anonymous) ticket holder. "It's really deeply transformative. It does what the best theater does - creates a sense of empathy, builds a bridge between you and someone who might not be like you at all, and creates a way to share an experience with a stranger…
 
Primary day is fast approaching and for dozens of races - mayor comptroller, city council - it's likely to be weeks before we get an answer on who won because of the new ranked-choice voting system. But there's one race likely to be settled on Tuesday night: Manhattan District Attorney. WNYC's Gwynne Hogan and Weekend Edition Host David Furst discu…
 
This year, Juneteenth is being officially recognized in New York and New Jersey as both a federal and state holiday. The day commemorates the day in 1865 when Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas—the last Confederate state in the west—to announce that 250,000 enslaved people were free, two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued.…
 
Saturday is Juneteeth. It's the anniversary of the day on June 19, 1865 when Union soldiers arrived in Texas, the last Confederate state in the west, to announce that 250,000 enslaved people were free. That's two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued. To celebrate, our sister station WQXR is holding a 24-hour marathon of composers an…
 
As of this week, more than 70% of New Yorkers have received at least one dose of a COVID vaccine. The milestone has meant that the state lifted most capacity restrictions — and now many people are thinking of this summer as the beginning of post-pandemic life. But when you kick the tires on that 70% number, you see a lot of disparities in just who …
 
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy on Friday signed into law a measure that would eliminate criminal conviction questions on rental applications, a move housing advocates are hailing as the most sweeping legislation of its kind in the country. Under the law, landlords would no longer be allowed to run a criminal background check until after they’ve condit…
 
It's a challenging time for most museums. Not only were they forced to close for months during the pandemic, but activists are calling on on them to rethink everything from the diversity of their staff, to who they take large donations from, to what they put on the walls. Now a new book from the former president and executive director of the Queens…
 
For the first time, the public will have a chance to weigh in on the latest plans for a new Port Authority bus terminal in midtown. There will be two days of virtual hearings taking place this week. After years of discussion about what to do with the 70-year old bus terminal at 42nd Street, the Port Authority announced this year its final decision.…
 
The governor gave the MTA state of emergency status in 2017—when things seemed dire. Regular signal problems disrupted the subways. There were broken train cars and three derailments. By signing the state of emergency, the MTA could bypass legal and oversight requirements for the sake of signing contracts for repairs, without all the bureaucracy. T…
 
At the highest tides in May and June, horseshoe crabs throng to New York City’s beaches to mate and lay eggs. Their numbers have been in decline recently, and that's a problem: their eggs feed migrating birds and their blood is used to test vaccines. WNYC’s Amy Pearl joined a crew of volunteers at Plumb Beach in Brooklyn to count and tag the ancien…
 
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