Science News offentlig
[search 0]
Mer

Download the App!

show episodes
 
KQED’s award-winning team of science reporters explores climate change, water, energy, toxics, biomedicine, digital health, astronomy and other topics that shape our lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. As a trusted news source, KQED Science tackles tough questions facing humanity in our time with thoughtful and engaging storytelling.
 
Listen to PBS NewsHour science reporting published every Wednesday by 9 p.m. Featuring reports from Miles O'Brien, Nsikan Akpan and the rest of our science crew, we take on topics ranging from the future of 3-D printing to power of placebo drugs. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Brooks and Capehart, Brief but Spectacular, Politics Monday and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS NewsHour is ...
 
SIT'N Listen is a production of Science in the News - a graduate student run organization at Harvard University committed to (1) bridging the communication gap between scientists and the rest of the world and (2) catalyzing discussions between scientists, other experts and enthusiasts. Here at SITN we bring scientists to you! Listen in.
 
Culturally insensitive commentary, space-time stuff and world news. In each episode, Hosts Herbie Pearlman and Brian Horustopheles Labrecque will de-construct the anatomy of the physical and or political universe. Brian is a writer and indie film god and Herbie Pearlman is a guru and spiritual advisor to the world's homeless Viagra enthusiasts. Find us at www.laser.yoga/scienceboobies
 
Daily news brief / summary to keep you informed about the most important global news in Business, Tech, Markets, Economy, Science, Arts. Briefs are available to the public 24h after release on Patreon. For today's brief visit patreon.com/morningmeeting
 
Loading …
show series
 
Most stars may have much more time to form planets than previously thought Planet-making disks may survive around many young stars for 5 million to 10 million years Planet-building disks of gas and dust (one pictured) survive for millions of years longer around orange and red dwarf stars than astronomers realized, a new study suggests.…
 
Researchers are building robots that can build themselves | Tech Crunch (00:52) MIT researchers are working on a project to develop robots that effectively self-assemble. Team admits this technology is “years away” Work so far has shown positive results At the system’s center are voxels, which carry power and data that can be shared between pieces.…
 
In our news wrap Saturday, COP27 climate talks inched closer to a deal to create a disaster fund for vulnerable nations, FIFA's head scolded critics of World Cup host Qatar, APEC wrapped up meetings in Bangkok, heavy snow fell in western New York, Trump called the appointment of a special counsel an "abuse of power," and President Biden attended hi…
 
A 3-D model of the Cats Eye nebula shows rings sculpted by jets The curiosity of a high school student unraveled the nebulas structure A 3-D visualization of the Cats Eye nebula (left) reveals partial gas rings (yellow) as well knots and whorls on either side of the central gas bubble (blue), all of which were probably sculpted by jets erupting fro…
 
After eons of isolation, these desert fish flub social cues Pahrump poolfish react oddly to danger, a new study finds The aftereffects of a really long natural quarantine linger in Nevadas endangered Pahrump poolfish (shown here in an aquarium) when forced to share water with other kinds of fishes.
 
Mountain lions pushed out by wildfires take more risks Californias Woolsey Fire in 2018 led to local mountain lions crossing roads more often A mountain lion wearing a tracking collar leads her cubs through the brush.
 
Dinosaur 'mummies' may not be rare flukes after all A rapid burial isnt the only way to preserve skin for fossilization, a study suggests In life, Dakota was a 12-meter-long duck-billed dinosaur (illustrated at top).
 
Black Death immunity came at a cost to modern-day health A genetic variant that boosts Crohns disease risk may have helped people survive bubonic plague Using DNA from the excavated remains of plague victims, including those buried in a London cemetery from 13481349, and from people who died earlier and later, researchers searched for evidence of h…
 
Protons may be stretchier than physics predicts Quarks inside the particles seem to move more than they should in an electric field A proton (illustrated) contains three particles called quarks (red, green and blue blobs).
 
Heres where jazz gets its swing Nearly imperceptible delays in soloists timing contribute to the musics signature rhythm Jazz musician Louis Armstrong, shown holding a trumpet, recorded What Is This Thing Called Swing?
 
Pollution mucks up the lungs immune defenses over time Impaired lung immune function joins the list of pollution-related health problems Particulate matter, one of the pollutants emitted from coal-burning power plants, accumulates over time in the lungs immune tissues.
 
Meet the BOAT, the brightest gamma-ray burst of all time The blast could challenge theories about these bursts of high-energy light An afterglow of X-rays (pictured) following a brilliant burst of gamma rays was spotted by the Swift space telescope about an hour after the burst was detected.
 
The pristine Winchcombe meteorite suggests that Earths water came from asteroids Bits of the space rock were picked up within 12 hours after landing in an English driveway Researchers from the University of Glasgow in Scotland found pieces of the Winchcombe meteorite in a field.
 
For the first time, astronomers saw dust in space being pushed by starlight The finding could help researchers understand how light sculpts matter throughout the cosmos Shells of dust form when winds from these two stars (center) in the Cygnus constellation collide, as seen in this image from the James Webb Space Telescope.…
 
Tiger sharks helped discover the worlds largest seagrass prairie Scientists equipped sharks with cameras to map a carbon reservoir half the size of Florida Tiger sharks equipped with cameras (one pictured here) helped researchers map the worlds largest seagrass ecosystem.
 
How researchers are working to fill the gaps in long COVID data To design new studies, researchers are working across specialties and partnering with patients Researchers studying long COVID are viewing patients experiences with the illness as a crucial source of data that can inform future clinical trials.…
 
A spider monkey's remains tell a story of ancient diplomacy in the Americas Its 1,700-year-old skeleton unearthed at Teotihuacan in Mexico suggests it was likely a gift from the Maya Archaeologists found the complete skeleton of a spider monkey (right) buried beside an eagle (left) and other animals at the base of a pyramid in the ancient city of T…
 
How physics can improve the urinal Among urinal prototypes, a tall, slender design with curves reminiscent of seashells (second from the right) accommodates people of a wide range of heights, virtually eliminating splash back.
 
These devices use an electric field to scare sharks from fishing hooks A new gadget attaches to fishing lines and emits a pulse of electricity every two seconds By attaching cylindrical SharkGuard devices (shown) to fishing hooks, tuna fishermen can greatly reduce the number of blue sharks accidentally snagged, a study finds.…
 
Zapping tiny metal drops with sound creates wires for soft electronics A new way to make stretchy wiring uses ultrasound and microscopic spheres of liquid metal Exposure to ultrasound creates nanoscopic balls nestled among larger microspheres of liquid metal (shown in this scanning electron microscope image) in a new approach to stretchy wiring.…
 
Long considered loners, many marsupials may have complex social lives Previous assumptions about the earliest mammals likely being solitary may also need revisiting Many marsupials, such as the squirrel glider ( Petaurus norfolcensis ) shown here, can live in a variety of social groups, such as a mating pair or a bigger group of males and females, …
 
Heres why some supermassive black holes blaze so brightly Astronomers saw a telltale signature of shock waves shooting along a jet Blazars (one illustrated) are active black holes that shoot jets of charged particles into space.
 
False teeth could double as hearing aids Jawbones transmit sound just as well as the bone that traditional hearing aids rely on A screw anchors a fake tooth to a persons lower jaw in this X-ray image.
 
Why dandelion seeds are so good at spreading widely Individual dandelion seeds on a single flower are destined to go in different directions Whether from nature or a childs puff, dandelion seeds are sensitive to wind direction, which helps them to disperse widely.
 
Roughly 1 million species of wildlife face extinction worldwide, according to a recent United Nations report. Ecologist and author Rebecca Nesbit joins Geoff Bennett to discuss the ethics and decision-making process behind figuring out which species to save. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Discarded food is responsible for as much as 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Rhode Island PBS Weekly's Isabella Jibilian reports on why so much food is going to waste and what some people are doing to try to stop the trend. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/ab…
 
"Polytherapeutic" tinnitus treatment app delivers impressive results | New Atlas (00:49) Tinnitus is when you experience ringing or other noises in one or both of your ears. 5% of people experience tinnitus at some point in their lives A team of researchers at the University of Auckland has found it's new smartphone app treatment is getting strong …
 
The capital of Norway is working to be nearly emission-free by 2030. Every year, the city of Oslo calculates how much emission-producing activity will contribute to greenhouse gases, then implements a carbon budget to keep those levels low. Lisa Desjardins speaks with Heidi Sørensen, director of Oslo's Agency for Climate, to learn more. PBS NewsHou…
 
U.S. and Chinese climate negotiators met formally for the first time in months at the COP27 global climate summit. Beijing had blocked bilateral climate discussions back in August, but they resumed after President Biden's meeting earlier this week with Chinese President Xi. Nick Schifrin reports on the collaboration and China's outsized impact on c…
 
Up and down the Mississippi River basin, below-average rainfall has constricted one of the country's major economic thoroughfares. Some areas along the river are reporting their lowest water levels in decades and it could affect consumers across the country. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about…
 
For the first time in half a century, NASA is starting to make its way back to a lunar landing. The Artemis rocket was finally able to launch early Wednesday morning after prior delays, sending an unmanned capsule around the moon. At the same time, there are plenty of questions about the path NASA has chosen to make this happen. Miles O'Brien repor…
 
Loading …

Snabbguide

Upphovsrätt 2022 | Sitemap | Integritetspolicy | Användarvillkor
Google login Twitter login Classic login