Quantum Physics offentlig
[search 0]
Mer

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
'Simply blooming' formerly Budai are a collaboration of people in many forms sharing co-creatively infinite soundless to sound frequencies of vibrational adventures. Always open in expansion, shifting, oscillating but most of all ‘being’ exhilarated in a life that shares infinity, immersing into infinite sound waves connected to conscious growth always.
 
View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/8-04S13 Instructor: Allan Adams This course covers the experimental basis of quantum physics. It introduces wave mechanics, Schrödinger's equation in a single dimension, and Schrödinger's equation in three dimensions. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
 
Radio Physics is for everyone! You don't have to be a scientist or even an aficionado to be fascinated by the questions and answers that you'll hear between 4:30 and 5:00 on the fourth Tuesday of every month. Radio Physics is a collaboration with top high school physics students from Aspen to Rifle, the Aspen Center for Physics, and KDNK Community Radio in Carbondale. Students interview one of the more than 1,000 physicists who visit the Aspen Center for Physics every year.
 
This is a podcast about learning and teaching physics, from someone who's been in the trenches for almost two decades. We'll also discuss how to relate the classroom to big ideas in contemporary research: like what circuits have to do with quantum mechanics, how special relativity impacts us - literally every day - and how the Doppler effect can teach us about the earliest moments - and the farthest reaches - of our universe. Whether you’re a student or an instructor, you’ll find a wealth of ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, the cosmologist and theoretical physicist Laura Mersini-Houghton of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill joins us to talk about big questions in cosmology such as why did the universe come into existence and what, if anything, existed before the Big Bang? googletag.cmd.push(function() …
 
Paul Davies has been exploring the esoteric nature of physics in his popular science books since the 1970s. The Arizona State University physicist talks to me about his latest book What’s Eating the Universe and Other Cosmic Questions and also gives some top tips for aspiring science writers. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-g…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast I chat with Erica Salazar of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who is developing high-temperature superconductor magnets for the next generation of fusion reactors. She explains why these materials could help make the dream of fusion power come true and why the magnets must be protected f…
 
The human brain can do tasks such as image recognition much more efficiently than a computer. This is why Kwabena Boahen is developing an electronic architecture called Neurogrid, which mimics how our brains process information. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, the Stanford University researcher explains how he and his colleague…
 
Gemma Hill, a rising junior at Aspen High School interviews Stephanie Palmer , Associate Professor at the University of Chicago in the Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy and the Department of Physics. She studies how neurons collectively encode incoming information and perform computations on the information. The brain performs several cl…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, we chat about the physics involved in some of the things we do while on holiday – from surfing to slapping on sunscreen. Holiday food and drink will also get the physicist’s treatment as we learn why wood-fired brick ovens make the best pizza and talk about an online calculator for chilling bever…
 
If you built a very expensive telescope, would you hitch it to a balloon and fly it 40 km above the surface of the Earth? That is what Mohamed Shaaban at the University of Toronto and an international team will do next year when they launch their SuperBIT telescope on NASA’s superpressure balloon. Shabaan explains why the team is putting their tele…
 
It is summer holiday season, at least here in the northern hemisphere, and hardworking physicists deserve a break. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, editors chat about holiday hotspots for physicists including Isaac Newton’s home and dark skies parks for stargazing. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-37…
 
As you listen to this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, your phone will be struck by particles created by collisions of cosmic rays with atoms in the atmosphere. The vast majority of these particles have no effect on digital electronics, but very occasionally they can flip a bit. While this is usually harmless, it can have dire effects o…
 
Hi Friends, Ganesh and Lord Shiva were very adamant that we record this podcast and share with you all. It is an awesome time to be present in a world that recognises its ability to be empowered nano second by nano second. So Ganesh and Shiva share what it is to BE PRESENT and allow the light to shine nano second by nano second through recognising …
 
Danie Way, a rising junior at Glenwood Springs High School interviews Sarah Loebman , an assistant professor in astrophysics at the University of California, Merced. Sarah 's primary research interests are in galaxy evolution, clustered star formation, and chemo-dynamics in the Local Universe. She is also a devoted teacher and student advocate, and…
 
Have you ever wondered why some long-jumpers cycle their legs in the air after take-off, why the 400 m race can have no more than nine lanes, or what’s the optimal stride length that athletes should aim for between hurdles? With the Tokyo Olympics beginning this week, our reviews and careers editor Laura Hiscott has put together a physics-related q…
 
When the cosmologist Stephen Hawking published A Brief History of Time in 1988, he quickly became the world’s most famous physicist. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we talk to science writer Charles Seife about his new book, a biography of the late cosmologist entitled Hawking Hawking: the Selling of a Scientific Celebrity, in w…
 
Wearing a face mask is a part of daily life for many of us; but how much do we know about the physics behind how they work? In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Kai Liu at Georgetown University explains why a nanoporous metallic foam that he has developed could lead to masks that offer better protection from diseases such as COVID-1…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with the physicist James Burridge and the linguist Tamsin Blaxter, who have teamed up to study how local dialects in England have changed during the 20th and 21st centuries. The duo has used probability and statistical physics to chart the evolution of language between two Engli…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we look at the science of three very different types of materials. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-3759129-1'); }); First we hear from Vanessa Hearnden , Julian Dean and Stephen Birch of the University of Sheffield, who have sent caramel wafers to prospective students…
 
In just a few short years, quantum science and technology has gone from the lab to the boardroom with companies ranging from tech giants to tiny start-ups seeking to commercialize quantum devices and algorithms. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-3759129-1'); }); In this special Quantum Week edition of the Physics World W…
 
Quantum science and technology is growing by leaps and bounds as more physicists choose careers in quantum physics and new companies spring up to develop quantum processors and other devices. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-3759129-1'); }); In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we meet Maria Violaris and …
 
The astrophysicist Catherine Heymans has made history by becoming the first female Astronomer Royal for Scotland, an office that was created in 1834. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, she talks about her new role and how she will use it to show that science is relevant to everyone. One initiative she has planned will ensure that …
 
Creating a quantum computer that integrates a large number of components is a huge challenge for many reasons. One is that most quantum bits (qubits) used today must be chilled to near absolute zero and therefore isolated from the room-temperature electronic components used to control them. This makes it extremely difficult to have large numbers of…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast looks at how geoscientists and musicians interpret the soundscapes of the oceans in terms of both science and art. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-3759129-1'); }); Our first guest is geophysicist Rob Abbott of Sandia National Laboratory in the US. Earlier this year, he l…
 
This Sunday, 16 May, is the UNESCO International Day of Light so this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast focuses on the humble photon and some of the amazing science and technology that it makes possible. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-3759129-1'); }); Our first guest is the astronomer Megan Tannock of Canada…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with Jason Smith, who leads the photonic nanomaterials group at the University of Oxford, UK, and is the founder and director of the spin-out Oxford HighQ. Smith talks about some of the practical challenges faced by those creating quantum technologies and how having a solid back…
 
Perhaps one of the most exciting discovery in biophysics in the past decade or so is that some creatures use quantum effects to sense the Earth’s magnetic field. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Alex Jones of the UK’s National Physical Laboratory explains how this quantum navigation system is inspiring the development of new met…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, we look at the science of mining precious commodities, both real and virtual. Our first guest is the geochemist Kevin Telmer of the Artisanal Gold Council. He explains how the Canada-based organization is developing and promoting technologies designed to improve the lives of subsistence gold mine…
 
Physics Friday Muon g-2 The experiment webpage, and some extra videos and links to the Seminar can be found here. STEAM > STEM Brandi's @sciartbro instagram account Arts at Cern, and their instagram account. The College of William and Mary's Virtual Mural Conservation Challenge. Toni Feder's piece in Physics Today The Martian Helicopter Check out N…
 
Have physicists at Fermilab found evidence for a new force? In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast Sam Grant of University College London explains why he and his colleagues on Fermilab’s Muon g-2 experiment are excited about their recent measurement of the muon’s magnetic moment and what it could mean for the future of particle physics…
 
Loading …

Snabbguide

Upphovsrätt 2021 | Sitemap | Integritetspolicy | Användarvillkor
Google login Twitter login Classic login